John Baptizes Jesus

Then Jesus came from Galilee to John at the Jordan to be baptized by him. 14 And John tried to prevent Him, saying, “I need to be baptized by You, and are You coming to me?”

15 But Jesus answered and said to him, “Permit it to be so now, for thus it is fitting for us to fulfill all righteousness.” Then he allowed Him.

16 When He had been baptized, Jesus came up immediately from the water; and behold, the heavens were opened to Him, and He saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove and alighting upon Him. 17 And suddenly a voice came from heaven, saying, “This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.” ~ Matthew 3:13-17.

Summary
Despite John’s protest, Jesus is baptized by John, so that Christ can set the right example by being baptized. His baptism in water prefigures His being engulfed by a world’s sin on the cross, although sinlessly righteous Himself. He has no sin of His own that calls for His repentance.

The involvement of the triune Deity (Godhead), God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit is seen in action, as the Spirit makes a dove-like descent upon Jesus, and as the Father speaks His words of complete commendation of His Son, Jesus.

Analysis
“Jesus came … to be baptized” (v.13) — John’s baptism was a baptism of repentance. Jesus did not need forgiveness for He was sinless.

“John tried to prevent Him … But Jesus answered and said to him” (vv.14-15) — The baptism of Jesus had meaning both for Jesus and John and that it was God’s will for both their lives. They do not provide enough information to completely answer John’s question of v.14. The statements at vv.14-15 are only recorded by Matthew.

“Jesus came up immediately from the water” (v.16) — After being immersed in the Jordan river, Jesus came up from the water.

“the heavens were opened to Him, and He saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove and alighting upon Him. And suddenly a voice came from heaven, saying, “This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.” (vv.16-17) — This scene depicts the participation all three persons of the Godhead. The fact that the Bible asserts the oneness of God (monotheism, Deuteronomy 6:4) must be balanced with the Deity of Jesus and the personality of the Spirit. There is one divine essence and three eternal personal manifestations. The three divine personalities are often mentioned in the same context (i.e., Matthew 3:16-17; 28:19; Acts 2:33-34; Romans 8:9-10; 1 Corinthians 12:4-6; 2 Corinthians 1:21-22; 13:14; Ephesians 1:3-14; 4:4-6; Titus 3:4-6; 1 Peter 1:2).

Scripture taken from the New King James Version®. Copyright © 1982 by Thomas Nelson. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

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